Monday, 24 January 2011

Is it time for women officials in top flight football?

Can they run they line? Can the referee a top flight game? Are they any better or worse than male referees? Or should they stick with the female version of the game? Richard Keys & Andy Gray have once again brought this issue in to football. Here are a few for’s and against women officials.

The Pro’s

Women have become part of modern day football. That is a fact. At all levels they plan the game and in some cases they run the show, for example Karen Brady.

They now attend more games than they use to. You see them in the crowds, mainly in the home end sitting down not signing but they’re still there.

There’s no reason to say they don’t know the rules of the game, especially the offside rule as its now become very, very vague to what it actually is!

As long as their adequate and have the ability to do the job properly and fairly surely that’s all that matters.
Could this be the key that brings a bit more respect in to the game of football?

The Con’s

Can the female officials take the abuse? Fans up and down the country give all sorts of stick and abuse to the officials when they think they have got a decision wrong. How would a female feel if they had 30,000 fans screaming at them? Is it worth it?

Can they keep up with the pace of a top flight footballer? Walcott, Lennon, Bale and Rooney all are lighting quick and offside’s could be down to millimetres, can females keep up with the pace with a fully grown professional footballer or with an up-coming youngest like Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain or Conor Wickham?

Is professional football a male sport that doesn’t need to be politically correct?

Will a modern day footballer actually listen and respect a female official?

Can it really work? Or does football need to start to use technology to help officials in the game already?

It’s a very interesting subject but I don’t know what the correct answer is. It will be interesting though to see what happens with Richard Keys and Andy Gray at Sky in the end.

3 comments:

  1. In your "Cons" section you stated "How would a female feel if they had 30,000 fans screaming at them? Is it worth it?" what exactly does this mean? why does it make a difference if it is a woman being shouted at than a man? or are you merely holding the conception that women are more emotional and easily upset? People do no like mbeing shouted at regardless of their gender and therefore I feel this statement is invalid.

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  2. In today’s game a male linesman it has become 'custom' for them to get a whole load for stick from the fans. They know it’s part of the job and take it. What I asked is if a woman can? In hostile stadiums such as Upton Park, The Den, Elland Road etc would they freeze? Would they be able to take all the abuse? Will they get intimidated? That’s what I’m asking do they really want to put themselves through that?

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  3. Firstly, I agree with the first reply to your blog. What physiological or psychological aspect do women possess that makes you think a female couldn’t have 30,000 fans shouting abuse at them? Women are in fact capable of dealing with this in the same way their male counterparts can deal with it; block it out. Women are in much more high pressured jobs across the world where they don’t freeze and become intimidated, and I suggest they would want to do this job for the same reason as a man, for the love of the game.

    Secondly, I appreciate the question of can they keep up with the pace of a top flight male footballer as it cannot be argued men are physiologically faster than females. However, Florence Griffith-Joyner ran the 100m sprint in 10.49 seconds and is the current female world record holder; do you really think Walcott and Rooney can keep up with her? Cardiovascular training is important for any official, female or not, and would it be wrong to suggest that actually there are male officials in the premier league that also 'cannot keep up'. In addition, there is a system for officiating depending on their role; it is not required to sprint up and down the pitch continuously as referees for example have a path and areas to stand in to have the best view of the pitch and play.

    Is professional football a male sport that doesn’t need to be politically correct? In one word, YES. The Sex Discrimination Act 1975, The Equal Opportunities Act 1995 and The Equality Act 2010 also agree.

    You asked will a modern day footballer actually listen and respect a female official. Firstly, Rio Ferdinand tweeted his opinion regarding the recent controversial matter and gave his support to the lines woman in question; many others would follow in his footsteps. And if they don’t, should they be receiving the humongous wage that they are? Should respect of the officials not be standard within their job description regardless of gender?

    Furthermore regarding the use of technology in football, for as long as greedy men have power in football, this will not happen despite the detrimental effects that not using additional technology has on football as a game.

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